Book review: The Grief Hole by Kaaron Warren

The Grief HoleThe Grief Hole by Kaaron Warren

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Who’d have thought musicians have a dark side?

Theresa helps women find emergency housing. But sometimes that isn’t enough. Sometimes she has to intervene because she can see ghosts clustering around an imminent victim. After an intervention leaves her battered, she goes to reconnect with her Uncle and Aunt, where she is drawn into the mystery surrounding her lost cousin and her art. Is she strong enough to not be drawn in too far?

This is a tough review for me to write as I haven’t actually finished it, yet feel compelled to say something before DNFing.

I bought Kaaron’s book almost two years ago and thought it was about damned time I read it. I was immediately drawn in. As much as I hate using the terms “powerful” and “evocative” in book reviews,* I actually think they are apt here. There are some real gut-punch moments that bring you to the world of grief. The list of awards it has won is thus unsurprising.

And of course, this is exactly the time to read such a book…

With the stress of a pandemic, the upheavals to work, the uncertainties of the near future, this was just not the sort of book I could keep reading. This is a compliment to Kaaron, as this book certainly “evokes”* but that is just not what I need right now. I will have to return to finish the last third when real-life feels less like a horror novel.

* There are quite a few buzzwords that appear in book reviews and blurbs that don’t really say anything. Powerful? Like a steroid munching Nordic strongman, or a highly effecting and engaging narrative? Evocative? As in the imagination is stirred, or the emotions, or both?

Expect my next fiction review to be of something a little more light-hearted.

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Book Review: Grave Peril by Jim Butcher

Grave Peril (The Dresden Files, #3)Grave Peril by Jim Butcher

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

If you’re only three adventures into your life and already have innumerable enemies seeking vengeance, is it time to stop setting stuff on fire?

Harry Dresden has been trying to figure out why ghosts have been tearing up Chicago. The veil between the real world and the Never Never is in turmoil. His godmother wants him to come and play fetch with her. And the Red Court of vampires want him to come over for a meal. Things are going so well that a war might break out.

I’m admittedly late to the Harry Dresden fan club. Now having completed my second book in the series, I can see that Jim Butcher loves to stack the odds against Harry. No depths are deep enough, no insurmountable challenges big enough for Harry. Or as Murphy’s Law states: anything that can go wrong, does go wrong. Can’t wait to read more of this series.

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